Campaign priority

Revealing Mulberry Row

Campaign priority

Revealing Mulberry Row

One of the Foundation’s most revelatory recent projects involved the restoration of Mulberry Row, and the interpretation of the landscape of slavery at Monticello.

During Jefferson’s lifetime, Mulberry Row served as the plantation’s “Main Street”—a hub of industrial activity featuring more than twenty dwellings, workshops, and sheds. Over time, those structures were lost or repurposed.

Our 21st century challenge was to reveal this dynamic lost world.

In 2014, the Foundation launched the Mountaintop Project, a transformational initiative to fully restore Monticello—the House and landscape—as Jefferson knew it. Mulberry Row was a critical component of that project, bringing to life the stories of the people, enslaved and free, who lived and worked on the 5,000-acre plantation. This initiative has enhanced our understanding of Monticello and dramatically expanded the visitor experience.

Archaeologists and historians have spent more than fifty years uncovering the footprint of plantation life on the mountaintop. Their discoveries informed the restoration of two remaining Jefferson-era structures, as well as the physical and virtual construction of lost buildings through sophisticated computer modeling. For the first time in its history, the Foundation has undertaken the re-creation of two slave structures on Mulberry Row, presenting an incomparable opportunity to interpret the landscape of slavery at Monticello.

A restored Mulberry Row has enabled access to a vital layer of history on the mountaintop, and to stories of Monticello that have yet to be told.


All Priorities

CAMPAIGN SUCCESSES

Restoration and interpretation of the Textile Workshop, ca. 1776 Restoration and interpretation of the Stone Stable, ca. 1809 Re-creation of two slave structures on Mulberry Row Realignment of the historic Kitchen Road

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